Introduction

<i>Cloud Watching</i> 2019

Authors: Jillian Eve Kron

Abstract

This piece began as a stream of consciousness drawing. Two rows of sexless faces all looking in the same direction formed what reminded me of a gust of wind. I continued using the face as a repeating unit to create the sky. Cloud Watching was heavily influenced by the Ukiyo-e period of Japanese art and the psychedelic fractalization of objects by the human eye during altered states of consciousness.

Keywords: Gradients Observation Face Ukiyo-e Fragmented/Divided Sky 
DOI: http://doi.org/10.21061/spectra.v7i1.121
 Accepted on 29 Jan 2019            Submitted on 29 Jan 2019

Cloud Watching, 2019

What do you see in the sky when you look up? I see people all around us.

This piece began as a stream of consciousness drawing. Two rows of sexless faces all looking in the same direction formed what reminded me of a gust of wind. I continued using the face as a repeating unit to create the sky. Cloud Watching was heavily influenced by the Ukiyo-e period of Japanese art and the psychedelic fractalization of objects by the human eye during altered states of consciousness.

Each face acts as a building block to form the sky, emulating and replacing the organic forms found in nature. The use of color and repetition serves two objectives: the former imbues the piece with a dynamic undulation while the latter strips the faces of any individuality.

The reality of modern life is that everyone is in a constant state of looking down. Looking into their technology. Looking at the devices that have been said to “connect” our species more than ever before, as social media allows people to live in a suspended state of comparison and observation. Cloud Watching asks the viewer to look up.

Competing Interests

The author has no competing interests to declare.